Category Archives: public health

If You Like to Write…

Request for Proposals –

The Graduate Medical Education Consortium of Southwest Virginia has proposed a collection of essays to McFarland Press. Titled Healing Ourselves, with a tentative subtitle along the lines of Physicians Respond to the Opioid Crisis in Appalachia or Healthcare Providers tell their stories of Appalachia’s Opioid Epidemic.

We are looking for a wide range of approaches to the topic, with the intent that these individual narratives should tell together the larger story of what is happening in the region. If you are actively involved in treating pain and/or addiction in Appalachia, we would like to hear from you. We are particularly interested in stories that focus on reflective awareness or solution-driven activity. If you’ve been part of a working solution, tell us about it.

We understand that many substances continue to play a role in Appalachia’s addiction story; your proposed story should not focus on other substances to the exclusion of opioids.

Please send a one-page write-up of your approach to telling a piece of the big story on opioids/substance abuse in Appalachia. Do not put your name on this page but please include why you are well-positioned to write this unique piece.

On a separate page, please give us your name, profession and titles, geographic location, work location (are you based out of a hospital, private or free clinic, college or university, etc.) and why you are interested in writing for this collection. Please include e-mail and phone contact details.

McFarland is primarily an academic publisher; we are looking for writers who can address their topic with narrative skill and present data or complicated terms in language appealing to readers overloaded with faceless statistics. Tell us a story. Tell us YOUR story.

We look forward to reading your proposals on Monday, Sept. 9. Email them to director@swvagmec.com

 

 

WIC Works

At Head for the Hills 2015, Jessica Arney MS, RD, LD provided an overview of the WIC (Women, Infants & Children) program.

Her WIC Works presentation included:

  • the immediate benefits of nutrition education, counseling, supplemental foods and breastfeeding support.
  • long term positive health outcomes associated with participation in the program
  • the differences between WIC and SNAP

There were also resources such as Health Bites, so contact your local health department and have WIC Work for your patients!

REVIVE!

Virginia has been severely impacted by opioid abuse, particularly the abuse of prescription drugs. In 2013, 386 individuals died from the abuse of FHMO, an increase of 1,578%, with fentanyl being the primary substance fueling this increase.  In 2013, drug-related deaths happened at a higher per capita level (11.0 deaths per 100,000) than motor vehicle crashes (10.1 per 100,000).

REVIVE! is the Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education (ONE) program for the Commonwealth of Virginia. REVIVE! provides training to professionals, stakeholders, and others on how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone (Narcan ®).

At Head for the Hills, Dr. Hughes Melton provided an overview of the REVIVE! program. This allowed the participants to:

  • Understand the REVIVE! program, including lay administration of naloxone, protection from civil liability, and the safe reporting of overdoses law
  • Understand how opioid overdose emergencies happen and how to recognize them
  • Understand how naloxone works
  • Identify risk factors that may make someone more susceptible to an opioid overdose emergency
  • Dispel common myths about how to reverse an opioid overdose
  • Learn how to respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone

Additional information about REVIVE! and opioid abuse in Virginia can be found on the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services website.

 

Finding Research Data Sources

The Rural Resident Research Symposium held at UVA-Wise in April included a presentation on Finding Research Data Sources for Populations in Rural Virginia.” by Susan Meacham.

The presentation strove to answer the question; Where do I find data on rural populations to answer hypothesis driven research questions?     It then addressed the following objectives:

  • Identify primary and secondary sources of data
  • Recognize the procedures needed to obtain approvals to use personal record information in research
  • Locate common sources of county, district and state level data for rural populations

The examples provided in the presentation were based on a study the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine is conducting on the chronic health conditions in Central Appalachia.  It strives to determine not only what is “going wrong” in coal country, but what is going right.

View the presentation.