Category Archives: public health

WIC Works

At Head for the Hills 2015, Jessica Arney MS, RD, LD provided an overview of the WIC (Women, Infants & Children) program.

Her WIC Works presentation included:

  • the immediate benefits of nutrition education, counseling, supplemental foods and breastfeeding support.
  • long term positive health outcomes associated with participation in the program
  • the differences between WIC and SNAP

There were also resources such as Health Bites, so contact your local health department and have WIC Work for your patients!

REVIVE!

Virginia has been severely impacted by opioid abuse, particularly the abuse of prescription drugs. In 2013, 386 individuals died from the abuse of FHMO, an increase of 1,578%, with fentanyl being the primary substance fueling this increase.  In 2013, drug-related deaths happened at a higher per capita level (11.0 deaths per 100,000) than motor vehicle crashes (10.1 per 100,000).

REVIVE! is the Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education (ONE) program for the Commonwealth of Virginia. REVIVE! provides training to professionals, stakeholders, and others on how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone (Narcan ®).

At Head for the Hills, Dr. Hughes Melton provided an overview of the REVIVE! program. This allowed the participants to:

  • Understand the REVIVE! program, including lay administration of naloxone, protection from civil liability, and the safe reporting of overdoses law
  • Understand how opioid overdose emergencies happen and how to recognize them
  • Understand how naloxone works
  • Identify risk factors that may make someone more susceptible to an opioid overdose emergency
  • Dispel common myths about how to reverse an opioid overdose
  • Learn how to respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone

Additional information about REVIVE! and opioid abuse in Virginia can be found on the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services website.

 

Finding Research Data Sources

The Rural Resident Research Symposium held at UVA-Wise in April included a presentation on Finding Research Data Sources for Populations in Rural Virginia.” by Susan Meacham.

The presentation strove to answer the question; Where do I find data on rural populations to answer hypothesis driven research questions?     It then addressed the following objectives:

  • Identify primary and secondary sources of data
  • Recognize the procedures needed to obtain approvals to use personal record information in research
  • Locate common sources of county, district and state level data for rural populations

The examples provided in the presentation were based on a study the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine is conducting on the chronic health conditions in Central Appalachia.  It strives to determine not only what is “going wrong” in coal country, but what is going right.

View the presentation.

 

 

SEPTEMBER NATIONAL CHILDHOOD OBESITY AWARENESS MONTH

September Childhood Obesity AwarenesssAccording to healthfinder.gov one in three children in the United States is overweight or obese.  Childhood obesity puts kids at risk for health problems that were once seen only in adults, like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.

Complications of childhood obesity are:

  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Liver Disease
  • Asthma
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Emotional & Mental Health
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Feet Problems

September Childhood Obesity Contributing Factors

AUGUST NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION AWARENESS MONTH

August ClipVaccines give parents the safe, proven power to protect their children from over a dozen serious diseases before the age of 2.  Diseases such as flu, measles and whooping cough (pertussis) can be life threatening to newborns and young babies.  Women should receive the Tdap (tetanus, diptheria, pertussis) vaccine with each pregnancy between the 27-36 week time frame.

August Clip 3Children age 4 to 6 need boosters for DTaP (diptheria, tetanus, pertussis), chickenpox, MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) and polio.  At 11 or 12 years of age preteens and teens need Tdap (tetanus, diptheria, pertussis), MenACWY (meningococcal conjugate vaccine) and HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccines.  Yearly flu shots are recommended for children 6 months and older.

August Clip 8 Young men and women who have not started or finished the HPV vaccine series can be vaccinated through 26 years of age.  Meningococcal vaccine is recommended especially first-year students who will be living in residence halls.

August Clip 5Immunization helps prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases.  To stay protected against serious illnesses like the flu, measles and tuberculosis adults need to get their shots—-just like children do.   All adults get the yearly flu vaccine and Tdap once if not received at adolescence to protect against pertussis (whooping cough) and a Td (tetanus) booster every 10 years.  Other adult vaccines such as shingles (caused by the chicken pox virus varicella), pneumococcal, hepatitis and HPV depending on life style and health status.

August Clip 9Vaccines protect not only individuals but entire communities and that is the reason vaccines are such a vital part of the public health goal of preventing diseases.

August Clip 7

MAY IS BEHAVIORAL HEALTH MONTH

Behavioral-HealthMay is the month when we focus on Behavioral Health. In Southwest Virginia, we are designated as federally underserved in Behavioral Healthcare. We especially seek pediatric behavioral health specialists, but we’re always happy to talk to anyone interested in doing a residency rotation or being recruited to the area in this underserved field.