looking ahead with a new president- what’s next for rural health?

The inauguration of a new president is the story that has dominated headlines this past week. Top of mind for much of the country are questions surrounding what will be different under this new administration. The Daily Yonder has worked with some rural health community leaders to better understand what they expect and hope to see under President Biden. Click the link below to read what they had to say.

Virginia Rural Health Industry Updates

The Virginia Rural Association is hosting a series of quarterly market updates for rural healthcare stakeholders to stay current on the changes in the healthcare marketplace in order to strategize responses to ensure vital services for rural communities. These hour-long sessions are designed with rural providers in mind and will provide crucial updates of the effect of the pandemic on the industry at large. The first event of 2021 is taking place on January 26th, 2021. For more information and registration, please visit link below.
State of the Healthcare Industry: Market Updates for Rural Strategy

Rural Counties in jeopardy for initial vaccination plan

With all of the buzz around the approval of the vaccines for COVID-19 from Moderna and Pfizer, the next question naturally how to get the vaccine to those that are most susceptible to the virus. As it stands currently, the federal government will lean on pharmacies to help distribute vaccines as soon as they become available, however a new study shows that nearly a third of rural counties in the US do not have a pharmacy that is connected to a network that can participate in the federal COVID-19 vaccination program. This study, done by the RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy and Analysis states that 750 of the nearly 2000 nonmetropolitan countries do not have a pharmacy listed in the HHS vaccine distribution partnership. The populations of these counties account for nearly 13% of the total rural population, which is nearly 5.6 million people. Currently there is not a fix to mitigate this challenge.

Virginia COVID-19 vaccine Roll out plan

Governor Ralph Northam laid out the state’s three-phased plan for the distribution of the coronavirus vaccines. After months of news limited to tales of the tragedy this virus is causing for the country, this plan comes as good news. There are two companies preparing to roll out their vaccines, Pfizer and Moderna, both of which say their vaccine is 95% effective. In the first phase of the distribution plan, Virginia will receive 70,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine and will distribute them to health care workers on the front lines of fighting this virus and residents of long-term care facilities. A more detailed plan of who will get vaccines first will be created by the Virginia Hospitals and Health Association and the Virginia Disaster Medical Advisory Committee.

GMEC Publication POINTS OUT Tuskegee LEgacy

Ashley Marshall, a CEO of the YWCA non-profit in Lynchburg, is a contributing author to COVID Conspiracies, edited by GMEC’s CEO Wendy Welch.

Marshall discussed the legacy of true conspiracies such as the Tuskegee Project on Black community responses to COVID-19 vaccine trials, in a podcast for the Virginia Rural Health Association.

The National Rural Health Association expressed appreciation for the insights via their newsletter:

COVID conspiracies and African American communities The latest Rural Health Voice podcast hosted by NRHA member Beth O’Connor of the Virginia Rural Health Association focuses on COVID-19 conspiracies in African American communities. Ashley Reynolds Marshall of YWCA of Central Virginia, who coauthored a forthcoming book about COVID-19 conspiracy theories, discusses how mistrust of public health initiatives is sometimes well earned, particularly among minority populations. “It’s actually very serious when people stop to think about how many of these conspiratorial thoughts are actually rooted in historical facts and historical events for communities of color,” Marshall says. NRHA is currently seeking session proposals and original research for presentation at the association’s Health Equity Conference, which is scheduled for May 4 in New Orleans.

head for the hills

FOR CME CREDITS: 

This Live activity, Head for the Hills 2020, with a beginning date of 09/19/2020, has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Ballad Health and GMEC. Ballad Health is accredited by the ACCME to provide 4.0 CME credits for physicians. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

To claim the credit physicians must submit to the AMA the completed Direct Credit Application or Resident Credit Application, along with the required documentation and appropriate processing fee. Complete instructions are found on the AMA website.

Copy of Speaker Presentation Slides:

Registration for Head for the Hills 2020!

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  • What: GMEC’s Annual CME Conference
    • Theme: Contemporary Opioid Prescription and Management
    • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Ballad Health and GMEC. Ballad Health is accredited by the ACCME to provide 4.0 CME credits for physicians.
  • When: September 19th from 2PM to 6PM
  • Where: Virtual Zoom Webinar -or- The Inn at Wise | Wise, VA
  • Guest Speakers: 
    • Biopsychosocial Approach to Addressing Addiction in Primary Care – Kevin Myers, PsyD (Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Cherokee Health Systems)
    • Controlled Substance Safe Prescribing: Including TN/VA State Regs/Guidelines  and Federal Laws – Steven J. Baumrucker, MD, FAAFP, FAAHPM (Medical Director, BHMA Palliative Medicine Associates)
    • Understanding Opiate Addiction – Vance Shaw, FASAM (Medical Director, High Point Clinic)
  • Please click HERE for free registration

More than $38 million available to Virginia schools in additional coronavirus relief

Recover, Redesign, Restart 2020Additional funding through the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund and the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund will be available statewide. 

$21 million in available GEER funds will be distributed to schools through formula-based and competitive grants. The money will support things such as:

  • School nutrition operations and
  • Virtual instruction for students in need of devices and broadband access.

$17.75 million in available ESSER funds will support:

  • Special education services and supports;
  • School-based mental health services and supports;
  • Social-emotional screening;
  • Summer academic academies;
  • Instructional delivery supports;
  • Cleaning/sanitizing supplies for schools and school buses; and
  • Facilities upgrades and protective equipment.

School divisions received a consolidated application for GEER and ESSER state funding earlier this week. The due date for completed applications is Aug. 14.

Click HERE for updates on K-12 Education. 

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