Category Archives: Southwest Virginia

NBC News: Coronavirus strains rural hospitals to ‘the absolute limit’

Although coronavirus has yet to make the same harsh impact on rural communities as in metropolitan areas around the United States, their financial reality may drastically reduce their best efforts when preparing for the worst.

Most facilities have already to turned to telehealth in order to minimize that one-on-one contact. However, as Beth O’Connor, director of the Virginia Rural Health Association, states, “Many of our rural families, and even many of our rural hospitals and clinics, don’t have the bandwidth that they need to be able to participate in telehealth service. So when you have something like this pandemic when you would prefer to see someone virtually, it’s just not possible.”

Click HERE to read.

How to Make a Face Mask: Protection Against COVID-19

Join others in learning how to sew face masks for your community members that desperately need them! Click HERE to view easy-to-follow instructions and a video made by Deaconess Hospital staff.

 

PLEASE SEND MASKS!

CHECK YOUR BARNS! (and garages, workrooms, etc.) Have you got boxes of gloves (latex, plastic, or vinyl), N95 face masks? Those are badly needed and GMEC can make sure they get redistributed. Have you got surgical masks, face shields, plastic dust masks, safety goggles? Those are needed as well.

If you are hand-sewing masks, we also have locations that need those. They are not front-line COVID but are VERY useful for other parts of care. If you would like to sew masks, we can send you patterns.

THANKS and PLEASE check your basements et al. We’ve sent several N95s to small clinics because of kind people willing to share what they have. EVERY donation will help keep our rural communities safe.

Contact director@swvagmec.com so we can tell you where to mail, or collect. Thanks!

Head for the Hills Agenda

GMEC is pleased to present the agenda for our 2016 annual conference and retreat, Head for the Hills, below! Come unwind, dine, and play with us for two days in the beautiful Hungry Mother State Park while learning from some of Virginia’s leading rural health experts. Families of attending medical professionals are very welcome and activities have been planned for your enjoyment.

Head for the Hills 2016 Schedule:
Hungry Mother State Park, Marion, VA

Friday Sept. 30

7:00 a.m.

Registration opens
Coffee, tea, and hot chocolate available

Child care can be provided 8-noon for those requesting it.

7:15-8:30

Continental breakfast available

8:00-8:50

NUTRITION TIPS FOR YOUR PATIENTS
Kathy Hosig, PhD, MPH, RD Virginia Tech

8:50-9:40

POWER AND POLITICS: LEADING IN A TIME OF CHANGE –
Lorenzo Pence, DO, FACOFP, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

9:40 -10:00

BREAK (fruit provided)

10:00-10:50

Clinical Documentation Toolbox
Nora Blankenbecler, Director, Health Information Technology Certification Program, Mountain Empire Community College

10:50-11:40

PSYCHIATRY IN SW VA: What Primary Care Physicians Should Know –
Sarah Hazelwood, DO, Southwestern Virginia Mental Health Institute, Marion, Virginia

11:40-NOON

HABIT AND HABITUS: A Faith-based Health Initiative (Resident Presentation) –
Dr. Troy Reece, PGY2, Johnston Memorial Hospital Family Medicine Residency

12:15

LUNCH

FREE REST OF DAY – Group rates are available at the historic Lincoln Theatre in downtown Marion. Hikes, the beach, paddle boats, and other activities are available within the park. Several restaurants are available in town. There is no communal dinner, but GMEC is happy to provide your evening meal in the park, same set menu, available during restaurant hours; because of the many options available via the park and town, we are not planning to offer children’s entertainment.

Saturday Oct. 1

7:30 a.m.

Breakfast and registration

Child care can be provided 8-noon for those requesting it.

8:00-8:50

WHAT DOCTORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT TELEHEALTH 
Kathy Wibberly, PhD, Director, Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center at University of Virginia

8:50-9:40

BREAKOUT SESSIONS –

9:40-10:00

BREAK

CHECK OUT
Required check out from your cabin; luggage may be brought to the lecture hall

10:00-10:50

PATIENT VOICES
Jane Bennett, Cancer Survivor and Advocate

10:50-11:40

BREAKING BAD NEWS: Communicating a Difficult Diagnosis or Lifestyle Change –
Thomas Ward Bishop

11:40-12:30

SUD TREATMENT EXPANSION BY MEDICAID –
Sue Cantrell, MD, LENOWISCO Health District Director, VDH

12:30-1:00

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Secretary Bill Hazel, MD, Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

LUNCH

Box lunches will be provided; eat at your leisure in the conference center, or take it with you if you need to depart.

Please feel free to stay and enjoy the park after the conference concludes!

 

Affording Medical School

There’s no doubt about it — medical school is expensive. But U.S. News & World Report has compiled a list of 10 private medical schools with the lowest tuition and fees for the 2015-16 academic year.

Here are the 10 most affordable private medical schools and their 2015-16 out-of-state tuition rates, according to U.S. News & World Report:

  1. Baylor College of Medicine (Houston) — $31,663
  2. Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (Erie, Pa.) — $32,985
  3. University of Pikeville–Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine — $41,320
  4. University of Miami Miller School of Medicine — $42,626
  5. Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine–Virginia campus (Blacksburg, Va.), Carolinas campus (Spartanburg, S.C.) and Auburn (Ala.) campus — $43,250
  6. Kansas City (Mo.) University of Medicine and Biosciences — $43,513
  7. Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (Cumberland Gap, Tenn.) — $46,528
  8. Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (New York City) — $48,340
  9. Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine (Hempstead, N.Y.) — $48,500
  10. Mayo Medical School (Rochester, Minn.) — $49,900

See those three schools in bold type?  That’s right – three out of the top ten are in our region!

Save the Date!

Are you a medical resident?

Are you working in or for rural Southwest Virginia (or surrounding areas)?

Then mark off April 22nd on your calendar and plan to be at the Second Rural Residents Research Symposium!

This is a day for residents to present original research (not case studies) regarding topics of interest to rural primary care docs and their peers.

Slots at the Rural Residents Research Symposium are 30-45 minutes long; anyone interested in presenting must meet the criteria of rural focus and should apply through their residency coordinator.

A limit of two applications per residency program will be accepted with a total of 10 presentations.  The top two presentations will be invited to speak at the 2016 Head for the Hills event in October.

For questions, contact GMEC Director Wendy Welch at wow6n@uvawise.edu

More information coming soon!