Category Archives: cultural competency

If You Like to Write…

Request for Proposals –

The Graduate Medical Education Consortium of Southwest Virginia has proposed a collection of essays to McFarland Press. Titled Healing Ourselves, with a tentative subtitle along the lines of Physicians Respond to the Opioid Crisis in Appalachia or Healthcare Providers tell their stories of Appalachia’s Opioid Epidemic.

We are looking for a wide range of approaches to the topic, with the intent that these individual narratives should tell together the larger story of what is happening in the region. If you are actively involved in treating pain and/or addiction in Appalachia, we would like to hear from you. We are particularly interested in stories that focus on reflective awareness or solution-driven activity. If you’ve been part of a working solution, tell us about it.

We understand that many substances continue to play a role in Appalachia’s addiction story; your proposed story should not focus on other substances to the exclusion of opioids.

Please send a one-page write-up of your approach to telling a piece of the big story on opioids/substance abuse in Appalachia. Do not put your name on this page but please include why you are well-positioned to write this unique piece.

On a separate page, please give us your name, profession and titles, geographic location, work location (are you based out of a hospital, private or free clinic, college or university, etc.) and why you are interested in writing for this collection. Please include e-mail and phone contact details.

McFarland is primarily an academic publisher; we are looking for writers who can address their topic with narrative skill and present data or complicated terms in language appealing to readers overloaded with faceless statistics. Tell us a story. Tell us YOUR story.

We look forward to reading your proposals on Monday, Sept. 9. Email them to director@swvagmec.com

 

 

Head for the Hills Agenda

GMEC is pleased to present the agenda for our 2016 annual conference and retreat, Head for the Hills, below! Come unwind, dine, and play with us for two days in the beautiful Hungry Mother State Park while learning from some of Virginia’s leading rural health experts. Families of attending medical professionals are very welcome and activities have been planned for your enjoyment.

Head for the Hills 2016 Schedule:
Hungry Mother State Park, Marion, VA

Friday Sept. 30

7:00 a.m.

Registration opens
Coffee, tea, and hot chocolate available

Child care can be provided 8-noon for those requesting it.

7:15-8:30

Continental breakfast available

8:00-8:50

NUTRITION TIPS FOR YOUR PATIENTS
Kathy Hosig, PhD, MPH, RD Virginia Tech

8:50-9:40

POWER AND POLITICS: LEADING IN A TIME OF CHANGE –
Lorenzo Pence, DO, FACOFP, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

9:40 -10:00

BREAK (fruit provided)

10:00-10:50

Clinical Documentation Toolbox
Nora Blankenbecler, Director, Health Information Technology Certification Program, Mountain Empire Community College

10:50-11:40

PSYCHIATRY IN SW VA: What Primary Care Physicians Should Know –
Sarah Hazelwood, DO, Southwestern Virginia Mental Health Institute, Marion, Virginia

11:40-NOON

HABIT AND HABITUS: A Faith-based Health Initiative (Resident Presentation) –
Dr. Troy Reece, PGY2, Johnston Memorial Hospital Family Medicine Residency

12:15

LUNCH

FREE REST OF DAY – Group rates are available at the historic Lincoln Theatre in downtown Marion. Hikes, the beach, paddle boats, and other activities are available within the park. Several restaurants are available in town. There is no communal dinner, but GMEC is happy to provide your evening meal in the park, same set menu, available during restaurant hours; because of the many options available via the park and town, we are not planning to offer children’s entertainment.

Saturday Oct. 1

7:30 a.m.

Breakfast and registration

Child care can be provided 8-noon for those requesting it.

8:00-8:50

WHAT DOCTORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT TELEHEALTH 
Kathy Wibberly, PhD, Director, Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center at University of Virginia

8:50-9:40

BREAKOUT SESSIONS –

9:40-10:00

BREAK

CHECK OUT
Required check out from your cabin; luggage may be brought to the lecture hall

10:00-10:50

PATIENT VOICES
Jane Bennett, Cancer Survivor and Advocate

10:50-11:40

BREAKING BAD NEWS: Communicating a Difficult Diagnosis or Lifestyle Change –
Thomas Ward Bishop

11:40-12:30

SUD TREATMENT EXPANSION BY MEDICAID –
Sue Cantrell, MD, LENOWISCO Health District Director, VDH

12:30-1:00

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Secretary Bill Hazel, MD, Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

LUNCH

Box lunches will be provided; eat at your leisure in the conference center, or take it with you if you need to depart.

Please feel free to stay and enjoy the park after the conference concludes!

 

The Big-City Guide to Small-Town Living

The GMEC blog will be taking a break for the holiday season.  We leave you with this essay from the Daily Yonder:

I watched over the last decade or so as successful big-city professionals retire and move out to the fringes of my rural town. They typically buy farms or ranchettes and imagine themselves living in a sylvan or riverine setting with big horned owls hooting and coyotes howling in the distance after a kill. Some of them learn to fit in and truly find a home. Many others make it about five years and move back to the city or elsewhere, inevitably “to be closer to their grandkids.”

I wondered, what makes for a successful transition to the small-town life that I love so much. The following 10 rules I personally pulled out of a very authoritative hat.

Read the 10 Rules for Small-Town Living.