Category Archives: rural health issues

Rural Residents Research Symposium

The agenda has been posted for the April 22nd
Rural Residents Research Symposium:

8:30 am – Continental breakfast and registration

9:00 am – 10:00 am – How to Conduct Community Health and Primary Care Research
Dr. Alexis Stoner, Faculty Instructor and Course Director of Epidemiology, Clinical Prevention, and Population Health, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Carolinas Campus

10am – 11am – How do I report data on rural populations to answer hypothesis driven research questions?
Susan L. Meacham, Ph.D., R.D., Professor, Nutrition
Discipline of Family Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Virginia Campus

11am – 11:30am –Rural Health Clinics: the Overlooked Option

11:30am – 1:00pm – Lunch

1:00pm – 2:00pm – Habit and Habitus: A Faith-based Health Initiative
Dr. Troy Reece, PGY-1, Johnston Memorial Hospital Family Medicine Residency will present with attending physician Dr. Giovani Ferrante, vascular surgeon at Johnston Memorial Hospital

2:00pm – 3:00pm – Residency Culture: Survival Tips

The Symposium will be held at the Slemp Center of UVA Wise.

Click here to register.  For questions, contact GMEC Director Wendy Welch at wow6n@uvawise.edu

Affordable Medications

One of the hard realities of serving in rural communities is that many of our patients have a hard time affording the medications they desperately need.

We’ve located a resource to help with that process.  The National Center for Farmworker Health has produced a series of easy-to-read fact sheets about the safest and most affordable medications to treat specific conditions or illnesses. Topics include diabetes, heart disease, menopause, depression, and many others.

Available in both English and Spanish, each fact sheet is based on extensive reports published by Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs that share the results of research conducted to determine the most effective, safe and affordable medicines available in the market for each condition. Generic medicines, if available, were included in the analysis as well.

What other resources for affordable medications do you have?

Registration Now Open!

Registration for the Rural Residents Research Symposium is now open!

Scheduled for April 22nd at the Slemp Center of UVA Wise; this is a day for residents to present original research (not case studies) regarding topics of interest to rural primary care docs and their peers.

Slots at the Rural Residents Research Symposium are 30-45 minutes long; anyone interested in presenting must meet the criteria of rural focus and should apply through their residency coordinator.

A limit of two applications per residency program will be accepted with a total of 10 presentations.  The top two presentations will be invited to speak at the 2016 Head for the Hills event in October.

Click here to register.  For questions, contact GMEC Director Wendy Welch at wow6n@uvawise.edu

 

The Big-City Guide to Small-Town Living

The GMEC blog will be taking a break for the holiday season.  We leave you with this essay from the Daily Yonder:

I watched over the last decade or so as successful big-city professionals retire and move out to the fringes of my rural town. They typically buy farms or ranchettes and imagine themselves living in a sylvan or riverine setting with big horned owls hooting and coyotes howling in the distance after a kill. Some of them learn to fit in and truly find a home. Many others make it about five years and move back to the city or elsewhere, inevitably “to be closer to their grandkids.”

I wondered, what makes for a successful transition to the small-town life that I love so much. The following 10 rules I personally pulled out of a very authoritative hat.

Read the 10 Rules for Small-Town Living.

REVIVE!

Virginia has been severely impacted by opioid abuse, particularly the abuse of prescription drugs. In 2013, 386 individuals died from the abuse of FHMO, an increase of 1,578%, with fentanyl being the primary substance fueling this increase.  In 2013, drug-related deaths happened at a higher per capita level (11.0 deaths per 100,000) than motor vehicle crashes (10.1 per 100,000).

REVIVE! is the Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education (ONE) program for the Commonwealth of Virginia. REVIVE! provides training to professionals, stakeholders, and others on how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone (Narcan ®).

At Head for the Hills, Dr. Hughes Melton provided an overview of the REVIVE! program. This allowed the participants to:

  • Understand the REVIVE! program, including lay administration of naloxone, protection from civil liability, and the safe reporting of overdoses law
  • Understand how opioid overdose emergencies happen and how to recognize them
  • Understand how naloxone works
  • Identify risk factors that may make someone more susceptible to an opioid overdose emergency
  • Dispel common myths about how to reverse an opioid overdose
  • Learn how to respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone

Additional information about REVIVE! and opioid abuse in Virginia can be found on the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services website.

 

Do Residents Return?

“Grow your own” is a popular phrase for those trying to improve the supply of health professionals in rural areas.  But does it work? The USDA recently released a report titled “Factors Affecting Former Residents’ Returning to Rural Communities“.

Factors which encouraged residents to return to their rural roots:

  • presence of parents
  • desire to raise their children back home
  • easy-going environment
  • outdoor recreation

Local schools also played an important role.  People who had a positive outlook on rural schools came back; those who felt that urban schools would better fit their child’s needs, did not.

The report summary goes on to say:

Family motivations dominated, but returning home also depended on securing a job, often involving creative strategies to overcome employment limitations. Return migrants frequently mentioned their acceptance of financial and career sacrifices for returning home. Most nonreturnees who may have considered coming home cited low wages and lack of career opportunities as the primary barriers to their return.

So the challenge for rural recruiters is: what can be done to improve the factors that can be controlled – school systems and economic environment?