Check out that map!

JMH inaugural residency class dinner

Opening slide for Johnston Memorial Hospital’s Inaugural Residency class  dinner presentation



Double-click for a full-screen version.

So what’s on that map?  These are the Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatric residencies in Virginia (blue = MD, red = DO).   The counties are color coded by their County Health Status ranking.  Very light colors are the best rankings, dark green – the opposite.

Here’s the full list of the residency slots depicted on the map:

  1. Wellmont FM (DeBusk)
  2. MSHA Norton Community Hospital FM
  3. MSHA Johnston Memorial Hospital FM and IM
  4. HCA Lewis Gale Hospital – Montgomery FM
  5. HCA Lewis Gale Hospital – Montgomery IM
  6. OMNEE Carilion Clinic IM
  7. OMNEE Carilion Clinic FM
  8. VCOM Carilion Clinic FM with Pediatrics
  9. VCOM Danville Regional Medical Center IM
  10. VCOM Danville Regional Medical Center FM
  11. Centra Health FM
  12. UVA FM with Pediatrics
  13. UVA IM
  14. Bon Secours FM Rural VCU (St Francis)
  15. UP KYCOM Shenandoah Valley FM (Front Royal)
  16. VCU Shenandoah Valley FM
  17. VCU Chippenham and Johnston-Willis Hospitals Chesterfield FM
  18. VCU IM
  19. VCU Falls Church FM with Pediatrics
  20. Inova Fairfax Hospital IM with Pediatrics
  21. National Capital Consortium Ft Belvoir Hospital FM
  22. OMNEE Riverside Regional Medical Center FM
  23. VCU Riverside FM
  24. Eastern Virginia Medical School Portsmouth FM
  25. Naval Medical Center of Portsmouth IM with Pediatrics
  26. Eastern Virginia Medical School Ghent FM
  27. Eastern Virginia Medical School IM with Pediatrics

Do you have comments on the implications of this map? Do you know of other residency programs that should be included? Let us know!


GMEC logo

Why the wait?

What makes a general practice doctor good?  Or even great?  Sometimes, it’s how long you have to sit in the waiting room.

One Appalachian doctor was recently asked why an appointment for 2:40 wasn’t seen until after 3:00.  Her fantastic response outlines the realities for many physicians.  A test result came back positive for cancer – advanced cancer.  One patient can’t afford medication. Another’s spouse died.  All in a single day.

“One reason we are late: we take time.” 

Great doctors don’t see their patients as data on a chart.  They see real human beings with unique problems that can often only be addressed by their primary care provider.

Visit the Rapha Family Wellness site to review the full article.

Hands On!

Active learning vs. lecture:  What works best?  According to a recent review of students in STEM classes, those with hand-on lessons have higher test scores , while those in traditional lecture classes were more likely to fail.  As one article notes –

We know that learning is harder from the sidelines. If deep understanding is the objective, then the learner had best get out there and play the game. 

So how does that apply to medical education?  Students who are in a rural track at medical schools and students who have a preceptor in a rural region are able to interact with patients sooner – and learn more.

For example, at the Quillen College of Medicine, medical students can start working directly with patients as early as August in their first year by volunteering at the College’s free clinics.  Whereas students in urban programs may not have any patient interaction until well into their second year.

Click here for more on the new active learning research.

Finding Research Data Sources

The Rural Resident Research Symposium held at UVA-Wise in April included a presentation on Finding Research Data Sources for Populations in Rural Virginia.” by Susan Meacham.

The presentation strove to answer the question; Where do I find data on rural populations to answer hypothesis driven research questions?     It then addressed the following objectives:

  • Identify primary and secondary sources of data
  • Recognize the procedures needed to obtain approvals to use personal record information in research
  • Locate common sources of county, district and state level data for rural populations

The examples provided in the presentation were based on a study the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine is conducting on the chronic health conditions in Central Appalachia.  It strives to determine not only what is “going wrong” in coal country, but what is going right.

View the presentation.